C2 Chicken Adventures:The Blue Trim Coop

Our chicken coop is finally finished!  It took us about a week and a half of working off and on in our free time on it but its finally done and we love it!  Originally I was going to give you a basic break down of how we built our coop but sadly that’s not going to be happening.  Basically we drew a picture of what we wanted it to look like and some basic measurements and just ran with it.  So instead, I’m just going to share some pictures from start to finish of our coop and some updated photos of our chickens!  Enjoy! 

On a side Note:  Our go flow method to building our coop only worked out for us due to my hubby having built many playhouses while growing up.  I couldn’t have done it this way if I had built our coop on my own. (Can’t wait for him to build our future children one!)  So our coop was basically built like a mini-house!

Here’s some updated pictures of how big our chickens have gotten and I’m pretty sure they aren’t quite done growing yet.  We have one chicken that we call our crazy chicken due to that in their box and now in their coop and yard, she likes to sprint around and cause chacos. (By the way, this time around I’ve decided to give all our chickens the same name, Billina. So we have Billina 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, & 6.  Billina 3 is our crazy chicken!)

We started our chicken coop off by building our basic frame and adding in the floor.  We used a plastic grate so that their poo would just fall to the ground and make clean up much easier. (The house part is 4’x4′ and the whole coop measures to be 4’x8′)  Thankfully we didn’t actually have to buy a bunch of wood for our coop past a couple treated 2×4’s and plywood due to my hubby having most of it lying around our shop.

Once we had the basic frame of the house, we started construing the roof and nesting box.  Then once the whole house was framed out, we cut our plywood to face the house with. (And by we, I mean my hubby.  I just attached the wood to the frame.)

Once the coop was built, I painted the coop with some gray, exterior, semi-gloss paint.  While that was drying I took some bright blue paint we had left over from painting our office and painted all of the trim with it.  I just love how the blue pops off the gray.

Painting TipTIP:  When painting, if you are going to be painting over the course of a couple days or need to do more than one coat, take a large zip lock baggie and put your brush/roller inside with a little paint on them and they’ll stay good until you need to use them again.  Also if your using a large roller I like to tie a Walmart bag around the head of the roller so I can us it again.

And here’s our finished chicken coop!  We just love how it turned out!  I love that it’s functional for the chickens but yet still looks great in our yard!

Our coop ended up costing us around $150, which is great since all the pre-made coops we found were around at least $250 and up.  We were able to help keep our cost down with only having to buy plywood, a few treated 2×4’s for the bottom frame, 2 wheels (so we can move it around the yard every couple of days), a bar for the wheels, hinges, locks, and paint.  We lucked out in having all the other wood on hand, some left over shingles, and my father-in-law gave us the plastic grate for the floor and the hardware type cloth.  (We used hardware cloth due to that it’ll make it harder for predators to break into.  Chicken wire isn’t quite as strong.)

Our chickens have been living in their coop now for about a week and they love it!  Can’t wait for those eggs to start appearing!!! 🙂

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